What's Happening on Sunshine Coast Trails?

What's Happening on the Sunshine Coast Trails is designed to keep you up to date on new content added to this website and other interesting bits of related information.

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Nov 09, 2013

Coast Gravity Park

Coast Gravity Park will formally open in the spring of 2015, but there will be special ride days starting early 2014.

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Oct 13, 2013

Skookumchuck Narrows Route

Skookumchuck Narrows Provincial Park offers a beautiful, world famous hike into one of the most beautiful and powerful natural ocean rapids you will likely ever see. Right in your own back yard.

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Jul 23, 2013

Hotham Sound

Hotham Sound is a beautiful area to explore by boat or kayak. The area is somewhat protected and the water is considered to be some of the warmest in the area.

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Jun 27, 2013

Map Store

Sunshine Coast Trails map store includes mobile apps, water-resistant paper maps and eBooks were created for those who want the information from the website in a format they are comfortable with.

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Jun 25, 2013

A Short Chat with Rod Camposano

With the BC Bike Race just days away from hitting the Sunshine Coast (next Tuesday) I thought I'd have a short question and answer session with Rod Camposano.

For those of you who don't know him, Rod is passionate about mountain biking and he is the course designer for the Sunshine Coast portion of the BC Bike Race.

The BC Bike Race brings riders from all over BC, Canada and the world to ride and race for seven days. It starts on Vancouver Island where they spend two days, then over to Powell River for a day, then Days 3 and 4 are spent here on the Sunshine Coast. Day 6 is Squamish and Day 7 Whistler.

Rod was kind enough to take a little time away from getting the race course ready to answer a few of my questions.

Why do you work so hard maintaining and creating new trails for the BC Bike Race every year?

We have a lot of trails on the coast and they all need maintaining but we try to get them done in the spring after the biggest storms (and before the Bike Race gets here). As for new trails, we have put in some links that were missing so the course flows a bit better.

Have you ever competed in the race yourself? What was the highlight?

No I have not competed although I have been able to ride Day 6 in Squamish a couple of times. These riders have put in a year of training to compete and most have never ridden our trails. They are on a pretty big high - it's fun chatting with them.

What is the best part of being involved in the race each year and designing the course?

Being involved with a big group that is so passionate about the sport.

What kind of changes have you got planned for the route this year?

Nothing for Day 4, but on Day 5 I have a new approach to the Roberts Creek trails that takes them through some very nice spots and it will be easier than last year.

Anything else you might like to comment on?

When it's done I get to ride my bike more!

Jun 10, 2013

Doriston, Sunshine Coast, BC

Doriston is a small, boat access only community on the south shore of Sechelt Inlet about a 10 minute boat ride from Egmont.

Continue reading "Doriston, Sunshine Coast, BC"

May 20, 2013

News and Events for Sunshine Coast Trails

News and events related to the trails on the Sunshine Coast.

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Jan 27, 2013

Sunshine Coast Trail Strategy - Press Release

Date: January 25th 2013
From: The Sunshine Coast Trails Society
Contact: Caroline Dépatie cdepatie@dccnet.com 604.886.5389

Following in the footsteps of many BC communities, the Sunshine Coast Trails Society will be overseeing the process of completing a crown land recreational trail strategy over the next two years. The main goals of the written trail strategy are to create an inventory of crown land recreational trails and, through public consultation, identify main trail networks. The strategy is an important first step in identifying which trails the community sees as important and valuable recreational assets to protect, to manage and, to be considered in future forestry plans.

The first major funder to come forward to support the trail strategy initiative is the Sunshine Coast Community Forest (SCCF) with the amount of $22,000. The SCCF decision to fund the trail strategy initiative falls under its community objective of supporting outdoor recreation economic development. A 2007 study from the Mountain Bike Tourism Association found that trails in the Sea to Sky area generated $10.3 million in tourism economic revenue over a 3 month period (June to September). The SCTS is hoping that additional funders will support the project and applications are underway with the Sunshine Coast Regional District with the grant-in-aid program and the Western Canadian Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

The SCTS is a non-profit society whose membership includes various trail user groups and individual members. The purpose of the society is to facilitate the development and management of a sustainable trail network for the Lower Sunshine Coast for educational, recreational, economic, social and environmental benefit to the public, and to do so collaboratively through community partnerships. A recent initiative completed by the SCTS in affiliation with the District of Sechelt is the completion of the Chapman Creek portion of the Suncoaster Trail. As the plan for the strategy unfolds, the SCTS hopes that all trail users and stakeholders will participate in giving input that will shape the content of the document. Look for ads in the newspapers and announcements in community calendars for scheduled community meetings around the trail strategy. For more information contact sctrails@dccnet.com

Dec 28, 2012

Sunshine Coast Trail Maps Go Mobile

Back in November I let you know about the release of the new iPhone app for Sunshine Coast Trails and at that time I was uncertain if and when we'd have one for Android phones. I'm happy to report that the app for Android phone users is now available!

You can find it at Google Play with the same name as the app for iPhones - Trailmapps: Sunshine Coast.

The maps are quite detailed and show contour lines, logging roads, streets, etc. Also, if your phone is capable and you are within range of GPS signals you can find out where you are and your elevation at that spot.

Here's a screen shot of the map for the West Sechelt area:

Nov 11, 2012

iPhone App for Sunshine Coast Trails - Available Now!

Almost a year ago I started thinking that it would be cool to have an app for all of the trails and maps on my website. No sooner did I start thinking about this than I was contacted by a fella who lives in Squamish who was interested in creating an iPhone app and wanted to collaborate!

Of course I said yes and shortly thereafter he started work on the app. Our original intent was to have it ready to go for last summer (2012), but life got in the way and for various reasons this didn't happen.

Finally, after a long wait, the iPhone app is available for download from the App Store. You will find it under Trailmapps: Sunshine Coast.

I'm sorry to say that for now at least, it is only for iPhones. If anyone knows someone who can create apps for Androids, please let me know. I'd love to see an Android app as well considering this is the type of phone I have :-)

Oct 10, 2012

Mount Hallowell Hike

Mount Hallowell is a strenuous hike in the Pender Harbour area with stunning views from the top as your reward.

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Sep 23, 2012

Mt. Steele - Tetrahedron Park

Last Saturday a large group of us hiked up to the peak of Mt. Steele in the Tetrahedron Provincial Park. At approximately 5400 feet or 1615 metres this is the highest peak on the Sunshine Coast.

At the peak!

Starting at the second parking lot the trip up is about 3 hours and covers approximately 8 kms. Return trip including some time to rest, eat and enjoy was about 8 hours. The first 4.5 kms is through forest and is easy to moderate difficulty. The final 3.5 kms is more difficult as it climbs quite steeply at times, but you climb through some beautiful alpine.

Mt. Steele Cabin in the distance as seen from the peak.

Mt. Steele cabin is nestled beneath the peak. The cabins in the Tetrahedron (there are four) are available for overnight use and are especially busy in the winter months.

Edwards Lake Cabin

The Tetrahedron is a protected area and includes the Sechelt community watershed. There are special rules in place that prohibit domestic animals in the area. Apparently their feces can carry certain pathogens that once in the ecosystem can cost millions to remove. Although it was hard for me, I left my dogs at home!

Jul 27, 2012

Facebook Post Goes Viral!

The other day I went up to Trout Lake Road to take my dogs for a walk and pick some berries. I took the trail/road that follows along the right of way for the gas line, parallel to the power lines and came across a pile of garbage that included a freezer, fridge and bunch of household stuff.


I knew it was a fairly new dump because it hadn’t been there the week before. I took a look and right on top was a receipt that included a name and address. I took a picture and thought maybe I should post it on my Facebook page for the website.

When I got home I had had second thoughts about posting the photo of the receipt. What if it didn’t belong to the people who dumped the garbage? What if they hired someone to take their stuff to the dump and that person dumped the garbage there? So instead I explained what I had seen, posted the photo of just the garbage and then asked “What would you do?”

The result of that one, fairly insignificant post is astonishing. The posting has gone viral with over 3,400 comments, 309 Shares and has reached over 100,000 people.

To say I was surprised would be an understatement. I was amazed, delighted and flabbergasted. What in the world was going on? Why such a surprising response to something that in the big scheme of things, was pretty small?

Today, I went out on my daily hike with my dogs and really thought about these questions. What follows is my short version of an answer.

I think it really hit a nerve with people because most of us are concerned and worried about what’s happening to the environment. There’s climate change that is a result of global warming. There are major oil spills like the one in Louisiana two years ago that completely devastated the Gulf Coast, sea and wild life. And right now, close to home, is the big debate over whether or not we will have twin oil pipelines from Edmonton, AB to Kitimat, BC.

These are just a very few of the concerns that we have to face and many people feel helpless and maybe hopeless about the future. How can one person keep things from continuing to spiral down? Many of us feel we can’t.

The people who dumped the garbage obviously have a blatant disregard for the natural world. They are selfish and self-serving - basically the characteristics demonstrated by our governments and big corporations with regard to the environment. Although we feel helpless to deal with these big issues and organizations, we do feel that we can do something about this one incident of dumping and by God people want something to be done about it!

Jul 22, 2012

Roosevelt Elk

Recently, I’ve posted about bears and wolves, but another animal that we share the Coast with is the Roosevelt Elk. The elk are not native to our area, but were transplanted to the Pender Harbour area back in the 1980’s. As the elk have moved down the Coast, the wolves have followed this food source.

Here is an excerpt from the E-Fauna BC website:

Most Roosevelt Elk in British Columbia live on Vancouver Island where they arrived at least 3,000 years ago. They are found over nearly all of the island except at the southern end and along most of the west coast south of the Brooks Peninsula. There are also small pockets on the mainland including the head of Phillips Arm and Loughborough Inlet, around Powell River, and on the Sechelt Peninsula. The animals near Powell River and the Sechelt Peninsula are the result of reintroductions mainly from Vancouver Island. The two introductions to the Powell River area were made in 1994 and 1996, and the three to the Sechelt Peninsula were carried out between 1987 and 1989.

I have come across the elk frequently on my hikes and see their droppings on all of my outings north of Sechelt. Generally the elk will move off as soon as they notice you, but in the fall when they are mating they can be aggressive and charge at you if you get too close. It is always a good idea to keep your dogs from chasing them as they will kick and your dog could be injured. Plus, it is obviously stressful for the elk to be chased by dogs.

Jul 15, 2012

Best Swimming Lakes on the Sunshine Coast

We are very fortunate on the Sunshine Coast to have some wonderful swimming lakes. In my opinion, they can’t be beat! Here are some of my old and new favourites.

Continue reading "Best Swimming Lakes on the Sunshine Coast"